North Ward National Bank

<1917>-<1917>:445 Broad Street
464 Broad Street

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The North Ward National Bank of Newark was organized on February 14, 1873 and is a financial institution that may be classed as typifying the eminently conservative, yet loyal and helpful. During the panic of 1907 this bank did not call any loans, sell any bonds or other securities or borrow any money. The management of the North Ward National Bank endeavors to so conduct its affairs that it will always be in a strong and flexible condition. At all times its resources are available for the help of business enterprises which have a genuine right to ask financial aid. The North Ward National Bank has resources of upward of $4,000,000. It has a commercial department, where a general banking business is conducted; a savings department, where four per cent interest is paid on all accounts on sums from one dollar to one thousand dollars. The North Ward National Bank also has safe deposit vaults with boxes of all sizes from five dollars per annum up. The officers are:

President, John W. Lushear
Vice-President, Joseph M. Smith
Cashier, Spencer S. Marsh
Assistant Cashier, William H. Pierson

From: "Newark, the City of Industry" Published by the Newark Board of Trade 1912

The inception of the North Ward National Bank occurred in 1873, when with comparatively meager assets, it began business. It is interesting to recall an early statement of the bank, made at the close of business February 21, 1880. Its resources then stated were $551,246.97 in total. To those associated with the bank as at present conducted, this figure seems almost amusing, so small is it in caparison with the millions of dollars now handled yearly.

The bank has been selected as a depository for State, County and City funds. The officers are men of sterling character and have long been before the public, their sound judgment and wise counsel having often been proved.

Accounts of banks and bankers, merchants, corporations and individuals are solicited by the management, and particular courtesy is extended to women depositors. Courteous attention is give to all who may wish to do business with the bank, whether it be much or little.